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Australia's most popular design blog.
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    Melbourne’s Newest Mecca For Mid-Century Design

    Shopping

    by Miriam McGarry

    Jarrad Turner at work in his Brunswick showroom, Nord. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Mid-century ahoy! Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Jarrad in the showroom. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Precision! Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Jarrad highlights that resotring heritage items is an aesthetic as well as environmental win. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Chair of our dreams! Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Repairing the furniture is a true craft. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Jarrad at work. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    As Nord has expanded, upholsterer James Hoy has joined the team. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Colour match ready. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Pull up a seat! Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    This sideboard taking a temporary spin on some wheeels! Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Ready for a new home. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Plenty of seats to choose from. Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    Photo – Lauren Bamford.

    After working for a decade as a graphic designer in Australia and the UK, Jarrad Turner began to apply his interest in design and detail to the physical realm. He would spend his spare time trawling through flea markets and second-hand shops, and eventually he started to buy and sell vintage design. This enterprise first started as a side hustle, mostly inspired by Jarrad’s desire to buy pieces for his own home. He explains ‘I continued to buy and restore items and sell them on, and from starting out of my spare room, it soon took over my graphic design work, and I became dedicated to dealing in vintage design.’

    Over the last 15 years, Jarrad has moved from fixing small scratches on one-off pieces, to now opening Nord, where he imports quality items from Europe, undertakes full restorations, and creates refurbished treasures for customers here. The showroom reflects Jarrad’s love of Scandinavian design, which first bloomed when he was studying. He describes ‘once I found a couple of Danish pieces locally, including a Hans Wegner sofa, I was truly able to appreciate the high quality of the craftsmanship and materials used.’ Finely crafted, functional Scandi design continues to be Jarrad’s passion, and a constant source of inspiration for his business.

    While the majority of pieces in the Nord showroom are sourced from Denmark, Jarrad has recently expanded his design horizons to include speciality items from Britain, Italy, France, the Netherlands and Germany. Jarrad acknowledges that he’s definitely found his dream job – with plenty of overseas trips to visit suppliers and local flea markets. Online buying can be great, but for Jarrad, being able to see the quality of an item, or stumble upon an unexpected piece is an important part of the process.

    Jarrad confirms that there seems to be a huge boom in is mid-century and vintage furniture at the moment, and that customers ‘seem less interested in brand names, and would rather choose something unique and of real quality that tells a story of who they are.’ He also highlights the growing awareness of the environmental impact of disposable items, and the understanding that restoring a beautiful vintage item is an excellent aesthetic as well as ethical choice. Win win!

    Nord
    261 Albert st
    Brunswick
    Victoria 3056

    Open Tuesday to Sunday, 10m – 5pm


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    TDF Talks with Singer, Songwriter and Storyteller, Clare Bowditch

    Podcast

    by Lucy Feagins, Editor

    Photo – Sarah Collins of Work + Co.

    I first met Clare Bowditch around 10 years ago, and since then have watched her career continue to rise, and also, adapt and morph over time. In the past decade she’s turned her hand to so many different creative projects… and it seems there’s nothing she isn’t good at! She won a logie for her role Offspring, she spent two years presenting ABC radio, she’s hosted workshops and events for creative people, and now… of course, she’s finally released her first book!

    The book, of course, is ‘Your Own Kind Of Girl’, and it’s a memoir of sorts. Clare’s passionate followers will know her as a ‘heart-on-the-sleeve’ sort of person, and that’s very much apparent in this book – and in our podcast conversation! This is a very candid chat about all the things that have led Clare to where she is now, and to the release of this book.

    There really is something quite magical about Clare. She has an uncanny knack for making you feel like the centre of the universe when she’s speaking to you. We very much hope some of that magic comes through in this podcast!

    Notes and Links

    Visit clarebowditch.com for all Clare’s news and more info on ‘Your Own Kind of Girl’, which is out NOW in all good bookshops.

    Clare is currently in the midst of her EPIC national book tour – check out the full book tour schedule here, and follow along on Instagram @clarebowditch.


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    An Architect’s Beachside Oasis In Byron!

    Architecture

    by Lucy Feagins, Editor

    The home of architect and interior designer Daniel Boddam, built by TK Constructions. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    The palm tree captures the coastal vibe! Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Photographer Kelly Geddes and architect and furniture designer Daniel Boddam.  Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    The renovations create new connections between the inside and outside. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    A new courtyard! Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    The Malibu Dining Table, in the spacious and bright living room. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    A simple and elegant kitchen. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Malibu side table in an earthy tone against the bright white room. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Sink into the C-Kelly Chair in this delightful lounge room! Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    These sheer curtains let the light in. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Pull up a seat in the C-Malibu Chair. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    The entire ground floor was reconfigured in these renovations. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    The Wave Bed with a Malibu side table. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Bathroom details. Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Photo – Andy Macpherson.

    Architect Daniel Boddam explains that this holiday home was designed to be a ‘calm, coastal oasis where we can feel relaxed and inspired.’ Daniel is no stranger to creating his own spaces, having previously designed his own apartments in both Potts Point and Bondi. For this project, he really upped the ante, custom-designing all the furniture!

    The home is guided by references picked up on Daniel’s travels – predominantly Ibiza – as he wanted it to ‘evoke a bohemian spirit of travel and adventure which is also relevant to Bryon Bay.’ The project began with a ‘full gut renovation’, where the garage was divided in two to create a new reading room/study. The kitchen and dining rooms were opened up and relocated to welcome in the natural light, and make the most of the surrounding views. Upstairs, the space was reconfigured to add an additional bedroom (from 2 to 3) with built-ins, a generous bathroom, and a wine cellar.

    The renovations also included introducing a new perimeter wall that creates an internal courtyard, connecting the living room and new reading room/study. The garden feels thoroughly tropical with blooming bougainvillea and plenty of lawn for lounging. So Byron! The rear of the home is open-plan and faces out to a re-landscaped area, densely planted with low-level succulents. Daniel highlights ‘every room has a green backdrop where the sights and sounds of the natural environment are invited in.’

    What really brings this home to life, though, is Daniel’s new furniture collection, titled Coast – inspired by ‘travel, adventures, and freedom.’ This home renovation was, in fact, the catalyst for Daniel’s collection, which includes an indoor sun lounger (Kelly chair) and  a set of tables at three different sizes that re-interpret the classic shape of the surfboard (Malibu Tables), alongside elegantly simple wall scones, a pendant light, bed, sofas and easy chair. Check out the range online, for your own little piece of this beautiful home!


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    A Light And Lofty Rural Masterpiece

    Interiors

    by Lucy Feagins, Editor

    The third and final project on Ross Farm – The Barn! Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Interior architect Andrea Moore and her dad Lindsay. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    The material palette provides close connection to the land. Fisher & Paykel Built-In Oven. Fisher & Paykel Induction Cooktop. Fisher & Paykel Integrated Single DishDrawer™. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    The kitchen, featuring granite and marble accents. The appliances are cleverly integrated behind the brass panels! Fisher & Paykel Built-In Oven. Fisher & Paykel Induction Cooktop. Fisher & Paykel Integrated Single DishDrawer™. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

     

    The Fisher & Paykel Integrated Single DishDrawer™ is quite literally part of the furniture. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Such a great and well-hidden feature – Fisher & Paykel Integrated Single DishDrawer™. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Fisher & Paykel Induction Cooktop makes a design statement on the pink granite marble. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    The double-storey height gives the space a delicious sense of volume. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Most of the furniture has been custom-built for the property. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    The entire accommodation has been lined with OSB to exaggerate the form and volume of the double-height space. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Bedroom details. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    The upstairs bedroom and bath. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Upstairs sink. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Upstairs bath. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Andrea was determined to make the downstairs bathroom both accessible and beautiful – and boy did she succeed! Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    Andrea and the team had grab rails specifically manufactured for the space. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    The Barn in all its glory. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    A spiral staircase connecting the levels. In background – Fisher & Paykel Built-In Oven. Fisher & Paykel Induction Cooktop. Fisher & Paykel Integrated Single DishDrawer™. Photo – Eve Wilson for The Design Files. Styling – Andrea Moore.

    We’re big fans of young interior architect Andrea Moore (of Studio Moore), who has worked closely with her father Lindsay (a very handy semi-retired vet!) to design and build a trio of boutique accommodation projects at Ross Farm, her family’s property in South Gippsland.  Together, Linsday and Andrea form an unstoppable design and construction duo!

    Last year, we featured the first of the Ross Farm projects – The Cabin. And last week, we took you inside the recently-finished quarters of The Dairy, and today we’re focusing on The Barn, the boldest and striking of the three!

    You wouldn’t know it to look at it, but The Barn is actually a complete new build. While the Moores had initially hoped to simply refit the existing barn building on site, they were forced to rebuild on the same footprint, then reclad the exterior with the original tin, to create a building as authentic to its origins as possible.

    This same attention to detail continues indoors, where locally sourced recycled features sit aside luxurious but hardworking materials such as brass and speckled granite. ‘I wanted to introduce granite as one of the main interior materials inspired by the natural landscape of our beautiful Wilson’s Promontory National Park which is just down the road, known for its giant granite boulders’, Andrea explains.

    As with all the other buildings at Ross Farm, each element of The Barn has been designed specifically for the space – including all furniture, cabinetry, light fittings, and hand basins. When rebuilding, the Moores lifted the roof level to allow for a mezzanine, creating a distinctly light and lofty feel. Highlighting windows captures the warm northern light and views out across the Tarwin Valley.

    Aside from its striking, contemporary design, one of the main features of The Barn is Andrea’s commitment to design the entire ground level to be compliant with accessibility standards. This meant the door openings, passageways, and the bathroom design were all important considerations. ‘I was determined to make the bathroom beautiful, as many accessible bathrooms are extremely utilitarian’, Andrea tells. ‘We had brass grab rails manufactured for the space, and I exaggerated the use of these throughout the bathroom, together with floor-to-ceiling pink granite’.

    The kitchen was designed to mostly ‘hang’ off the wall and look quite monolithic, clad in granite paving stones and brass sheeting. A Fisher & Paykel oven, induction cooktop and dish drawer have been seamlessly incorporated into the fit out. ‘The black induction cooktop is super minimal, which suits the aesthetic of the space and seamlessly sits into the granite benchtop’, Andrea says. Andrea and Lindsay were able to use the Dish Drawer within the wall-mounted cabinetry, integrating it into the scheme with a luxe brass door front.

    Like all the Ross Farm buildings, Lindsay and family friend Paul have played a major role in building most of the interiors by hand. ‘Having these crafts on hand has certainly driven the outcome of the project’, says Andrea. ‘Their can-do attitude has resulted in something truly unique, that proudly has the DNA of its makers built into it.’

    Fisher & Paykel, New Zealand’s award-winning appliance brand, has become a global force not just in product design, but also in kitchen design. The company is committed to research, development and collaboration and works closely with architects and designers to seamlessly integrate their appliances into kitchens in innovative ways. Visit, www.fisherpaykel.com to find out more.


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    A New Exhibition For Melbourne Ceramicist Bruce Rowe – In LA!

    by Miriam McGarry

    The sculptural works of Bruce Rowe, in his new exhibition ‘Recent Works’ on show at Stahl + Band in Los Angeles. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    Artist Bruce Rowe. Photo – Peter Ryle.

    WR19.02, 2019. Raku clay, white stoneware glaze, aluminium backing plate. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    FS19.35, 2019, Anchor clay, White stoneware glaze, Walnut plinth. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    WR19.18, 2019, Grey brick clay, Unglazed, Aluminium backing plate. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    WR19.13, 2019, Red brick clay, Unglazed, Aluminium backing plate. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    BFS19.52, 2019, Teracotta, Unglazed, Maple box frame. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    FS19.25, 2019, Grey brick clay, Unglazed, Blackened steel plinth. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    WR19.12, 2019. Raku clay, Grey stoneware glaze, Aluminium backing. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    BSF19.51, 2019, Anchor clay, White stoneware glaze, Maple box frame. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    WR19.26, 2019. Dark clay, White stoneware glaze, Aluminium backing plate. Photo – Brad Johnston.

    Melbourne based artist Bruce Rowe plays with striking geometric forms, shadow, reflection and colour in his  stunning ceramic sculptural works. In his exhibition, Recent Works, opening tomorrow at Stahl + Band in Los Angeles (!), Bruce continues his trademark architectural sculptures that evoke a sense of place, by exploring ideas of protection, defense, refuge and boundary.

    Bruce’s process is driven by the tactile experience of making, and rather than being inspired externally by specific buildings or landscapes, he explains that ‘the art is revealed through the work.’ His work often begins with drawing, and then creating studies and maquettes to test ideas, different clays and glaze finishes.

    Working with ceramics demands patience and discipline, and Bruce highlights that for some of the larger pieces, the final result was not revealed for up to six months. It is a good thing that Bruce finds great joy in the process of making, as he highlights ‘the ceramic process cannot be rushed or pushed to completion.’ With some works requiring multiple firings, extended periods of drying, and an uncertain outcomes… he still feels ‘a genuine sense of excitement heading to the studio to work!’

    All of the artworks in Recent Works are created using purpose-made clay bodies, which create a range of different finishes and surfaces. The exhibition includes three types of work – free standing sculptures, sculptural wall reliefs and box framed form studies. Installed on walls, plinths and standing in the gallery, Recent Works creates its own landscape, and a sense of place illuminated by golden LA light.

    If you happen to find yourself in LA, we’ve heard a rumour that there will be a signature cocktail on offer at opening night, the ‘Aussie 75’ featuring gin, champagne and fresh lime. The exterior of the gallery has also been painted with a stylised depiction of one of the works. Architectural inception!

    Recent Works
    Bruce Rowe
    November 9 -29th
    Stahl + Band
    2308 Abbot Kinney Boulevard
    Venice 
    California


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    The Perfect Sun-Drenched A-Frame Beach House

    Modernist Australia

    Patricia Callan

    We love forays into the more experimental varieties of Modern architecture almost as much as we love a good Australian Mid-Century beach shack (they’re design cousins really), so today we present a meeting of both.

    This soaring A-Frame house has an orientation of twin wins –  breezy, surf-side South and sun-drenched North nestled in the understated beauty of salty, tea-tree coastal bushland. Inside is not your usual rag-tag A-Frame interior but a stunning and sensitively refurbed 3- level home with endless timber lining and a clever use of era-specific pop; original MCM furniture, new light fittings, dotty kitchen and that red Pirelli in the bathroom (a person favourite in flooring) which indicates a skillful knowledge celebrating the era, without turning it into a retro side-show.

    Bravo and claps all round!

    View the listing here, and original MA article here.

    Run by Patricia Callan and Pete Bakacs, Modernist Australia is the passion-project/website dedicated to raising the profile of mid-century design and modernist principles in Australia. For more swell eye-candy, visit Modernistaustralia.com.


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    Peachy Green’s Feel Good Gardens

    Studio Visit

    by Sally Tabart

    Frances Hale, founder of Peachy Green landscape designers, in her gorgeous new Fairfield HQ. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Entrance to Peachy Green at the base of the Nightingale 2.0 project in Fairfield. Photo – Tom Blachford.

    Fran recently kitted out her space in luxe textures and confident colours with help from Ha Arch, as well as Hip V. Hype. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Fran and her new puppy! Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Shameless cute dog photo. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    The Peachy Green workspace, featuring a painting by Stephen Baker and cupboards by Mustard Made. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Stephen Baker painting. Mustard Made cupboards. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Fran working in the office. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    ‘The office started as a dream of convenience – to ride the kids to school then roll downhill to the office’, Fran tells. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Office details. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Fran at work. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    A client project in Northcote that has had time to grow into itself and become established. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Fran visiting a client’s garden in Northcote. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    Established trees and happy plants. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files.

    An earlier photo of the Northcote project shortly after completion. Photo – Tom Blachford.

    An earlier photo of the Northcote project shortly after completion. Photo – Tom Blachford.

    Another fantastic Northcote project. Photo – Steve Tan.

    ‘Our garden philosophy is to create a green sanctuary that evokes a sense of calm, and brings the wonder and character of plants and nature close into people’s homes’, landscape designer of Frances Hale of Peachy Green shares. Together with her team, Fran creates divinely lush, layered gardens, harnessing the rich natural resources unique to each garden – soil, aspect, climate, shade and native species.

    Originally from New Zealand, Fran arrived in Melbourne almost 20 years ago, ‘to pursue a career in a city where design matters to people’, she explains. She knew she wanted to centre her future around something related to art and design, and wisely decided to realise that creativity in gardens – ’I thought it would be good for the soul’, she explains (seriously, who has the whole work/life balance thing figured out that early?), ‘although I’m not sure I knew at that stage quite how much I would grow to love working with nature’ she admits.

    In 2011, Fran started her landscape design business, Peachy Green, first working out of her home, and steadily growing her practice to the ‘thriving little business’ it is today. Now, Fran and her team work from an exceedingly lovely workspace in Fairfield at the bottom of the new Nightingale 2.0 building, which she has recently decked out in layers of luxe textures and confident, bright bursts of soft peach and forest green (how fitting) with the help of Nick Harding at Ha Arch, as well as Hip V. Hype. ‘The office started as a dream of convenience – to ride the kids to school then roll downhill to the office’, Fran tells. ‘The sign popped up in my neighbourhood in the window of Nightingale 2.0, an organisation and movement that leads in such a positive direction for our cities and communities, it felt like the perfect home for Peachy Green.’

    When I asked Fran what she wanted to achieve in a Peachy Green garden, her answer focused first on the emotive potential. ‘That feeling where you don’t need to go out, but would rather spend the day at home because it holds everything you need to rejuvenate’, she says. ‘To step out and experience the garden with all your senses in all the seasons is a joy, and I love seeing how happy a garden – or even a pot plant – makes people feel’. 

    This sentiment is naturally echoed in Fran’s relationships with clients. ‘When designing a garden that often follows a complex renovation or build, it is impossible not to get caught up in the significance of finishing off a long journey – sometimes many years in the dreaming/planning/making’, Fran muses. ‘Getting to the heart of what they really want to feel when they are in their garden creates the most rewarding outcomes for everyone’. 


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    Australia’s Most Incredible Homes Revealed In the 2019 ArchiTeam Awards

    Architecture

    Amelia Barnes

    Blade House by Takt Studio, a finalist in the Residential New Award category. Photo – Shantanu Starick

    New Modern by Bower Architecture & Interiors, a finalist in the Residential Alteration and Additions category. (See our recent feature on this project here!) Photo – Shannon McGrath

    Cable House by Tom Robertson Architects, a finalist in the Residential Alteration and Additions category. Photo – Tatjana Plitt

    Fitzroy Terrace House by Taylor Knights Architects, a finalist in the Residential Alteration and Additions category. (See our recent feature on this project here!) Photo – Peter Clarke

    Cloud Cottage by Takt Studio, a finalist in the Residential Alteration and Additions category. Photo – Ingvar Kenne

    Bundeena Beach House by Grove Architects, a finalist in the Residential New Award category. Photo – Michael Nicholson

    Springhill House by Lovell Burton Architecture, a finalist in the Residential New Award category. Photo – Ben Hosking

    House at Otago Bay by Topology Studio, a finalist in the Residential New Award category. Photo – Paul Hermes

    Elemental House by Ben Callery Architects, a finalist in the Residential New Award category. Photo – Jack Lovel

    Finalists in the 2019 ArchiTeam Awards have been announced, including these incredible projects from the ‘Residential New’ and ‘Residential Alterations and Additions’ categories!

    ArchiTeam is a membership association founded in 1991 to empower small, medium and emerging architecture practices. Members are invited to enter the cooperative’s free architecture awards, recognising outstanding residential, commercial, community and unbuilt projects.

    In collaboration with Big Plans Melbourne, this year’s winners presentation on November 13 will see finalists’ work projected at 1:1 scale around a North Melbourne warehouse. Ticket sales are open to the public.

    From a glamorous revitalisation of a mid-century home, to a new rural build clad with metal sheets, there’s a lot to be excited about in these awards!

    Tickets to ArchiTeam Awards 2019 opening night announcement can be purchased here. Payments collected will be donated to the Koorie Heritage Trust.

    2019 ARCHITEAM RESIDENTIAL AWARDS FINALISTS

    Residential New Award

    Blade House, Takt Studio
    Bundeena Beach House, Grove Architects
    Clifton Hill Terraces, Field Office Architecture
    CLT, EM Architects
    Elemental House, Ben Callery Architects
    House at Otago Bay, Topology Studio
    Leongatha Shed, Wolveridge Architects
    Springhill House, Lovell Burton

    Residential Alterations and Additions Award

    Attic House, Madeleine Blanchfield Architects
    Brunswick House, Winwood McKenzie Architecture
    Cable House, Tom Robertson Architects
    Charles Street, Lande Architects
    Clad Pad, Mihaly Slocombe
    Cloud Cottage, Takt Studio
    East Malvern House Reduction, Rosstang Architects
    Existenzminimun, WHDA
    Fitzroy Terrace House, Taylor Knights House
    1602, Olaver Architecture
    House in the Woods, Warc Studio
    House in Yarraville, Circle Studio Architects
    House N, Joyce Architects
    Interact, Warc Studio
    Lilyfield House, studio203
    Limerick House, Solomon Troup
    Mason House, Bryant Alsop Architects
    New Modern, Bower Architecture & Interiors
    Residence AD&H, Open Studio
    Torquay Compartment Apartment, Winter Architecture
    Wedged, Alison Dodds Architect


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    A Coastal Home That Treads Lightly On The Earth

    Sustainable Homes

    by Lucy Feagins, Editor

    The 10 Star Home by The Sociable Weaver and Clare Cousins Architects. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    The timber clad house has the highest possible environmental credentials! Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    The rugged Cape Paterson setting. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Green AND beautiful! The Dreamer Couch by Pop & Scott, artwork by Spencer Shakespeare. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    The home opens up to welcome indoor/outdoor living. Artwork by Spencer Shakespeare. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    All of the timber used in the home is Forest Stewardship Council certified. Artwork by Bobby Clark, ceramics by Simone Karras. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Kitchen detail, with Sukin Kimmy Hogan Hand Wash and Hand Cream. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Clean lines and clean green footprint. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Has sustainability ever looked so good? Kitchen, with artwork by Bobby Clark, ceramics by Simone Karras, with Sukin Kimmy Hogan Hand Wash and Hand Cream. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Bed side details, with the Sukin Signature Hand and Nail Cream Tube, and Hydrating Facial Masque. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Sukin Signature Hand and Nail Cream Tube, and Hydrating Facial Masque with a Tantri Mustica vase. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Bedroom details. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    The surrounding coastal dunes. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    A hop skip and jump away from the beach! Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    In the bathroom with the Sukin SPF30 Sheer Touch Untinted Sunscreen, Super Greens Detoxifying Facial Scrub and Signature Foaming Facial Cleanser Pump. Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    Photo – Amelia Stanwix for The Design Files. Styling – Lucy Feagins.

    This sleek, contemporary home at Cape Paterson in the eco village development ‘The Cape’  was built with a specific agenda – to show that sustainability can be beautiful! The Sociable Weaver (TSW) is a developer committed to creating practical, economic and environmentally conscious homes, and in this project worked with architect firm Clare Cousins to create a home that exemplifies this ethos, without compromising on style.

    Dave Martin of The Sociable Weaver explains the intent of the project: ‘we wanted to show that we could create a home that was 10 star, carbon positive, as close to zero waste as possible, incorporating building biology dynamics, and ultimately beautifully designed.’ Dave was familiar with the work of Clare Cousins Architects, and saw the potential of aligning the environmental principles of TSW, with the design credentials of the celebrated Melbourne architecture firm.

    The coastal home uses passive solar design and cross ventilation to avoid the need for heaters or air conditioning, while double glazing keeps the warmth in. Other eco credentials include the use of Forest Stewardship Council certified hardwood, photovaltic solar panels on the roof, and the use of natural sealants and paints. While the home was designed to showcase The Sociable Weaver’s sustainable build credentials, Dave highlights ‘we ultimately hope the standard of this build becomes mainstream.’

    Being green isn’t always easy, and Dave highlights the difficulties of balancing a zero waste philosophy (amazingly, only three garbage bags of landfill were created in this project!), with high standards for the build itself, and of course, a commitment to carbon neutrality. He describes it was like ‘designing a Swiss watch – all components must work in unison, as they have an overall effect on the energy rating.’

    The 10 Star House is an exciting project for its ability to demonstrate just what is possible when forward-thinking architecture meets environmental ideals. Dave describes ‘by doing this, it creates a ripple effect – bringing these philosophies and building projects more into the mainstream.’ For The Sociable Weaver, this home has set a new benchmark for the future.

    Australian skincare company Sukin do everything they can to ensure our environment is protected. From partnering with Reef Aid to ensure the Great Barrier Reef has a future, to fully offsetting their carbon footprint. Discover the world of natural, and read more about their sustainability efforts at the Sukin Journal


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    A Japanese Inspired California Bungalow!

    Amelia Barnes

    The darkly painted facade of Elwood House by Splinter Society. Photo – Jack Lovel

    A leafy garden is a prominent feature of this property. Photo – Jack Lovel

    Landscape design by Eckersley Garden Architecture. Photo – Jack Lovel

    ‘The home is a series of small, intimate spaces designed to reveal moments of delight by either moving through them or just sitting and enjoying the passage of time,’ says the architect, Chris Stanley. Photo – Jack Lovel

    The client’s brief requested an intimate place to retreat from public life that respected but modernised the existing home. Photo – Jack Lovel

    A combination of dark, moody spaces with timber detailing feature throughout the project. Photo – Jack Lovel

    ‘The house is deeply personal to its owner and captures a lifetime of memories,’ says Chris Stanley. Photo – Jack Lovel

    Japanese design influences are evident in the dramatic bathroom. Photo – Jack Lovel

    Natural materials and a statement freestanding bath make up the stunning bathroom. Photo – Jack Lovel

    The renovation has better connected the home to its leafy garden. Photo – Jack Lovel

    A small swimming pool is among this home’s many surprises! Photo – Jack Lovel

    The architect wanted to create the feeling of being on holiday, without leaving home. Photo – Jack Lovel

    ‘While it retains a cosy cottage feel, it cannot be separated from the landscape that grounds it, expands it, frames it, and makes sense of its natural charm,’ says Chris Stanley. Photo – Jack Lovel

    The recent renovation of this Elwood home been designed by Splinter Society to feature several distinct and ‘moments’ throughout. The journey starts with the property’s dark and ornate bungalow facade, followed by a light-filled living room with garden views, before eventually leading into a dramatically moody bathroom.  ‘Our client requested an intimacy within her house. Living and working from home meant that she wanted a series of spaces with unique individual character, but with the warmth and security that the original house delivered,’ explains Splinter Society director, Chris Stanley. ‘The rooms remain defined, however they gradually open and connect together in a new way as you move through the house.’ 

    The home’s diverse mix of architectural influences is reflective of the client’s broad and ever changing brief. ‘We had to keep refining our thinking and the end result is a much richer result, with layers of meaning that evolved right through to the completion of defects,’ Chris says. One of the most prominent influences is Japanese architecture, as evident in the material selection of the bathroom, and the home’s protected position on the site. ‘California bungalows traditionally borrowed heavily from a Japanese housing vernacular,’ says Chris. ‘Given our clients love for her bungalow, we borrowed specific qualities and influences from this house style to developed a set of design informing principles.’

    One of the most successful outcomes of this renovation is the home’s new connection to its leafy garden, without a dramatic increase of the building’s footprint. A single room designed to act as a pavilion was added to the property for this purpose alone, in addition to several openings in the original rooms that better frame garden views. ‘Some connections to the garden are short views, and others are long and layered, but all create a sense that the house has been transported from its suburban block onto a much larger site,’ says Chris. The exact effect of this is difficult to capture in images alone, inviting an evolving array of light and shadows across the home’s surfaces throughout the day. 

    ‘This house is not about grand statements. It’s a series of small, intimate spaces designed to reveal moments of delight by either moving through them or just sitting and enjoying the passage of time,’ says Chris. ‘The house is deeply personal to its owner and captures a lifetime of memories. While it retains a cosy cottage feel, it cannot be separated from the landscape that grounds it, expands it, frames it, and makes sense of its natural charm.’


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